Morlands Factory – Glastonbury

Morlands was Glastonbury’s major industry – specialising in stuff made from sheep – like gloves, shoes, flying jackets etc.

In recent years, the huge 31 acre site has slowly been demolished leaving just a few buildings. There are plans afoot to redevelop the site

Out of the four remaining buildings, two of them were accessible…

Warehouse

I’m not sure what this building was for – it was relatively sparse inside so I’m guessing some sort of warehouse.

  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory

Chimney building

Another building, with a fabulous chimney. This place was used to make gloves and stuff. This building is listed because of its significant industrial architecture, so will survive the impending redevelopment.

  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory

This building was a bit more interesting inside

  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory

There were two wrought iron gates lying inside. Their fate is undecided but the Development Agency wants to offer them someone who will display them in a prominent public place.

  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory

The attic area was interesting – it was strewn with various labels, ribbons and bits…

  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
  • Thumbnail of Glastonbury Morlands Factory
Advertisements
This entry was posted in Industry, somerset and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Morlands Factory – Glastonbury

  1. Lauren says:

    Wow, so you can still get in here? I live near Bristol and every time I go to Glastonbury I have fought the urge to have a look around.
    I hear its being developed. Do you know when?

  2. MARIE LINHAM says:

    THE PICTURES ABOVE ARE OF MORLANDS AND BAILY’S.
    THE FIRST BUILDING WITH ALL THE GLASS BROKEN WAS MORLANDS. THE TOP FLOOR WAS THE PRODUCTION OF MORLANDS SLIPPERS, BOOTS AND SHOES. THIS FLOOR HAD MACHINIST AND FINISHERS ON.

    THE MIDDLE FLOOR WAS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SHEEPSKIN COATS, ALOMG THIS FLOOR WAS THE HAND CUTTERS OF COATS, MACHINIST AND FINISHERS.

    THE GROUND FLOOR IS WERE THE CUTTERS AND THE CLICKING MACHINES (CUTTING MACHINES) FOR CUTTING THE FOOTWEAR WAS.

    THERE IS AN OLDER BUILDING BEHIND THIS ONE WAS BAILY’S ANOTHER SHEEPSKIN FACTORY WHICH BOUGHT OUT MORLANDS.
    THIS BUILDING HELD THE OFFICES, BOARD ROOM, PERSONAL RECEPTION AT ONE END.
    THE TOP FLOOR CENTRE WAS THE SAMPLE ROOM WERE THE NEW DESIGNES FOR COATS WERE PRODUCED.
    MIDDLE FLOOR WAS FOR RUG FINISHING.
    BOTTOM FLOOR WAS MAINLY STORAGE.

    THE BUILDING WITH THE CHIMNEY ABOVE WAS WERE PRODUCTION TOOK PLACE.
    TOP FLOOR WAS HAND COAT CUTTERS AND STOCKROOMS.
    MIDDLE FLOOR WAS MATCHING DEPT WERE THE SKINS WERE MATCHED TO MAKE A COAT, MORE COAT CUTTERS, MACHINIST AND FINISHERS. PLUS STOCKROOMS.
    GROUND FLOOR HELD THE BOILER AND MAINTENANCE, PLUS THE PACKING AND DELIVERY DEPT.

  3. su says:

    The local development people are trying to knock down the remaining buildings to stop people, especially local teenagers, entering them.. This would be a travesty for the Industrial Landscape of both Street and Glastonbury. These buildings are structurally sound and should be reused. Help us stop the demolition, contact Mendip District Council, Cannards Grave, Shepton Mallet, Somerset and help us retain our industrial heritage!

  4. Bernard Hofmann says:

    I was quite shocked to find this site on the net. I have been a customer of Morlands products for many years and was wondering where I could buy new sheepskin slippers here in Germany. But no one knew. So I just skipped into the Internet in ordeer to get in touch with the company. Unfortunately I seem to have come too late….
    Do you know if there is still a production running anywhere else in the UK?
    Thank you

  5. Peter says:

    Hi there,
    I have just purchased a stunning Sheepskin Coat made by Baily’s of Glastonbury, so was wandering if anyone could tell me when Baily’s went out of production.
    Many thanks in ancipation of someones help,
    Pete.

  6. Peter says:

    Hi there,
    I have just purchased a stunning Sheepskin Coat made by Baily’s of Glastonbury, so was wandering if anyone could tell me when Baily’s went out of production.
    Many thanks in ancipation of someones help,
    Pete.

  7. Andy says:

    I used to come down from London and do the accounts 30 odd years ago. Morlands was a very impressive organisation in those days.

    It saddens me to see these photographs of the site now.

    Yet more of our national and local heritage bites the dust.

  8. Norman CVohen says:

    How sad I was to se the old Glastonbury factory. What upset me was the litter of unused labels of the Rolls Royce of sheepskin goods no longer being produced by Morlands of Glastonbury. I had a Carpet shop in Leamington Spa . My prized possession was my wonderful sheepskin coat which retailed at 49.50 sterling, purchased about 1968.

  9. Hannah Douglas says:

    Hi,
    I was hoping you could help me out with something. My step father was manager at the baily’s tannerie until 1989 shortly before its closure. As a little girl i grew up in the retirement cottages adjacent to the factory and have many happy memorys of riding my bike along the canal etc. I was hoping you cou could tell me if the row of red-brick cottages are still standing or have been refurbished? It’s so sad to see a place that was so dear to me looking so empty and sad.

  10. tony gorham says:

    I used to develop there stock and order processing software back in the 90’s. I loved in Essex then so drove to Morlands every Friday for about a year – happy days.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s